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Community-Curated Content Published by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Updated: 5 min 27 sec ago

Job: Digital Collections Curator, Florida International University

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 12:30

From the ad:

The Digital Collections Curator, in collaboration with the curatorial and library team, drives the creation of innovative digital products produced by and for The Wolfsonian at FIU and actively engages with a wide variety of communities, both online and in real life, as a means of engaging audiences using and creating digital technology and new media.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Mellon Postdoctoral Scholar in Library/Museum Collaboration

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 12:00

From the ad:

The MPS is a unique opportunity for a recent PhD recipient in the arts and humanities to develop as a researcher and scholar in a cross-disciplinary library/museum environment. The MPS will learn from and participate in the intellectual design, implementation, and assessment of this new, experimental program. The MPS will conduct research related to organizational models, best practices, digital tools and systems, and relevant research methods that will inform the program design and implementation.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Web Developer 2, University of Houston Libraries

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 11:30

From the ad:

The University of Houston Libraries is seeking a talented individual to fill its Web Developer 2 position. This developer will work with an agile team to develop, maintain, and integrate the University of Houston Libraries Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). They will provide advanced web skills in the areas of interface design, accessibility, utilization, and high performing scalable solutions.

Read the full ad here.

Editors’ Choice: Archives in the Anthropocene

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 11:00

I want to frame my talk around a quote from Community Futures Lab co-director Rasheedah Phillips from her workshop “Time, Memory, and Justice in Marginalized Communities.” She states “Oral Futures is about speaking into existence what you want to have happen.”

I want to think with you today about how such future-making materials are collected, preserved, and made accessible in a moment of extreme climate change and the attending displacements of people and animals due to environmental and political-economic erosion of homelands and sites of cultural heritage.

We cannot save everything, nor would we want to. Decisions have to be made about what to keep and what to discard; these decisions encode and reflect particular values, privilege and power structures—some decisions about what to be kept go against the community’s desire for privacy or restricted access to materials; this is a tension between surveillance and privacy, between visibility and erasure. Yvonne Perkins writes, “In the past people such as women, non-Europeans, Aborigines, the poor etc were not considered important contributors to our history so their stories are often not portrayed in archival records, or they were obscured in the archives by the social conventions of the time.”

Archives—in this usage I mean institutional, community, as well as digital collections curated by scholars—do not only exist to explain or contextualize the past, but also signal towards and shape futures. Archives call to the fore the processes of preservation, memory, and access. As Brit Stolli notes, attending to these processes raises uncomfortable questions of who decides what is significant to carry forward, in whose memory is the past best preserved, how do we (and who exactly counts as ‘we’) determine the ethical framework through which to focus our efforts of preservation and future-shaping? Absences and obfuscations are referred to as archival silences. Michel-Rolph Trouillot outlines the ways voices from the past are silenced:

  • there is a silencing in the making of sources. Which events even get described or remembered in a manner which allows them to transcend the present in which they occurred? Not everything gets remembered or recorded. Some parts of reality get silenced.
  • there is a silencing in the creation of archives—in this usage, Trouillot means repositories of historical records. At times this archival silencing is permanent since the records do not get preserved; other times the silencing is in the process of competition for the attention of the narrators, the later tellers of the historical tales.
  • And thirdly, the narrators themselves necessarily silence much. In most of history the archives are massive. Choices, selections, valuing must be done. In this process, huge areas of archival remains are silenced.

 

Read the full post here.

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