Providing resources and trai­ning in the practices and tools of the digital humanities
  • Home
  • Digital Humanities Now »
Subscribe to Digital Humanities Now feed
Community-Curated Content Published by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Updated: 59 min 17 sec ago

Back on Thursday!

Tue, 07/04/2017 - 11:00

Digital Humanities Now is taking the day off. We’ll be back with new featured posts on July 6th!

Job: Digital Archivist, University of Texas – Rio Grande Valley

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 13:30

From the job ad:

Scope of Job – To manage daily operations related to the digitization, organization, and access of special collections materials. Leads the efforts of the UTRGV Library in digitally preserving the culture and history of the university and the Rio Grande Valley.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Digital Humanities Developer, University of Virginia Library Scholars’ Lab

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 13:00

From the ad:

You might have seen our opening for a Senior Developer—we’re now seeking an additional colleague for our R&D team: DH Developer! Apply here (posting number #0621212), or read on for more information.

We welcome applications from women, people of color, LGBTQ, and others who are traditionally underrepresented among software developers. In particular, we invite you to contact us even if you do not currently consider yourself to be a software developer. We seek someone with the ability to collaborate and to expand their technical skill set in creative ways.

Read more here.

Announcement: Come Play in the Omeka S Sandbox

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 12:30

From the announcement:

Have you been intrigued by the posts and tweets about Omeka S but haven’t quite got around to installing it? Or have you just found out about Omeka S and are wondering what, exactly, it does? We have good news for you!

We are happy to announce the Omeka S Sandbox, a space the explore, play, and test out the functionality of Omeka S!

Read more here.

CFP: The Wearable and Tangible Possible Worlds of DH @ HASTAC 2017

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 12:00

From the CFP:

Building on the 2016 HASTAC Wearables and Tangible Computing Research Charrette, we are hosting an exhibition at HASTAC 2017 (Nov 2-4, Florida). We invite proposals for participation from scholars, artists, and activists at both student and professional levels. In particular, we are eager to see emerging and exploratory work in the broad range of wearables and tangible computing. In keeping with the Possible Worlds thematic of the event, proposals can be past, present, or future oriented and speculative work is welcome.

Read more here.

Resource: Ways to Compute Topics over Time, Part 2

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 11:30

From the resource:

This is the second in a series of posts which constitute a “lit review” of sorts, documenting the range of methods scholars are using to compute the distribution of topics over time.

Graphs of topic prevalence over time are some of the most ubiquitous in digital humanities discussions of topic modeling. They are used as a mechanism for identifying spikes in discourse and for depicting the relationship between the various discourses in a corpus.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Computers & Writing Session F1 – Critical Making As Emergent Techne

Thu, 06/29/2017 - 11:00

The panel “Critical Writing as Emergent Techne” worked with both criticality and technology, showing how both critical discourse and hands-on, constructive practices could reinforce each other in the college writing classroom.

Anthony Stagliano opened the session with a paper that situated “critical making” as a position that works to avoid both the “Scylla” of self-destructive or naval-gazing skepticism/criticality and the “Charybdis” of an over-excited indulgence in technology in the classroom simply for the sake of technology. The critical maker, Stagliano said, looks at technology with a subversive but playful eye, looks to see how the technologies work, how they can be opened up and modified, how they may be used to challenge the status quo, and how they can lead to perceptual shifts in conversations, in what can be done, what can be seen. “Critical making at its best is affirmative rather than negative,” Stagliano said; it’s about affirming possibilities, seizures, and perversions.

Bree McGregor offered her take on critical making in a video that explored her work with critical making in an online class. McGregor wanted to subvert common assumptions about online classes. Students believed that because the class was shorter, only a handful of weeks, and that it was online, there would be less rigor and less interaction required. McGregor sought to work against these expectations by involving the students in critical making exercises. In the class, students were immersed in “maker spaces” which demanded hands-on, tactile rhetorical constructs.

 

Read the full post here.

CFParticipation: Epoiesen – Call for Respondents

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 13:00

From the post:

I’m hoping to get Epoiesen unveiled in time for the autumn. You remember Epoiesen . Part of the idea is that we don’t do traditional peer review, but rather ask reviewers to be ‘Respondents’, who react to the piece in a short creative work on their own. We seek out at least two ‘Respondents’ (ideally) for every submission. The ‘Responding to…’ will itself be published with its own citation, DOI, etc. A response explores how the piece moves the responder, or puzzles her, or sparks new thoughts – a ‘Response’ is meant to become the starting point for a larger discussion that would take place via the site’s annotation framework (readers can annotate any piece of text on the site using Hypothes.is), across the blogosphere, and beyond.

Read more here.

Announcement: Innovate, Integrate, and Legislate – Announcing an App Challenge

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 12:30

From the post:

This morning, on Tuesday, June 27, 2017, Library of Congress Chief Information Officer Bernard A. Barton, Jr., is scheduled to make an in-person announcement to the attendees of the 2017 Legislative Data & Transparency Conference in the CVC.  Mr. Barton will deliver a short announcement about the Library’s intention to launch a legislative data App Challenge later this year.  This pre-launch announcement will encourage enthusiasts and professionals to bring their app-building skills to an endeavor that seeks to create enhanced access and interpretation of legislative data. .entry-content

Read more here.

Announcement: The Library of Digital Latin Texts (LDLT)

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 12:00

From the post:

Within the next year, the Digital Latin Library, in partnership with the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, will launch The Library of Digital Latin Texts (LDLT), a series of digital critical editions of Latin texts from all eras. The DLL will provide the encoding guidelines, infrastructure, and platform for publishing these texts, and the learned societies will be responsible for receiving submissions, reviewing them, and deciding whether or not to publish them. Policies and procedures for this endeavor are still in development, but it seems worthwhile in the meantime to explain what we mean by “digital edition” so that prospective editors can begin preparing submissions.

Read more here.

Resource: This Political Moment – Resources for Educators in the Trump Era

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 11:30

From the post:

Educators have long been responsible for supporting the growth and development of all young people. The job of designing engaging lessons, promoting respectful discussion, creating an inclusive classroom, and preparing youth for life in democratic society is never an easy one. We expect educators to perform these and countless other feats on a daily basis. And, this particular political moment is especially challenging. Characterized by record-high indicators of polarization and ideological discord among our major political parties, this political moment has made educators’ routine job duties remarkably challenging and ever-important. What follows is a brief overview of a few of the significant challenges that face educators today. This document also provides a handful of supplementary resources to support equitable teaching and learning in this political moment (accessible through the open-access hyperlinks).

Read the full post here.

Editors’ Choice: The History of the Pedometer (and the Problems with Learning Analytics)

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 11:00

These were my remarks as a guest speaker in Donna Murdoch’s class “Online Teaching and Learning – Applying Adult Learning Principles” this evening. I was asked to speak about learning analytics, but like I said in my keynote last week at NMC, ed-tech is boring. So this is a talk about pedometers.

“Know thyself” – this is an ancient maxim, of course. But it’s become not so much a philosophy of introspection or reflection but a compulsion for data collection and data analysis. We now live in a culture of quantification. (We have for a while now, no doubt.) All this is aided today, no doubt, by new computing technologies that create and collect massive amounts of personal data.

Learning analytics, in some ways, is a symptom of this data-driven culture – one that also is not new to education. Learning analytics are technologies that support and reflect the idea that we can collect and measure and analyze data about learners in order to know what they know, in order to optimize what and how they learn.

I want to invoke the guest speaker’s privilege and talk about something slightly different than what I was asked to speak about: that is, learning analytics. Now, I hope you’ll see that almost everything I say is very much related to learning analytics and to education technologies more broadly – to how we’re asked to hand over our personal data to various hardware and software companies, to our employers, to the government, to our schools under the guise of better “outcomes,” more productivity, and so on.

 

Read the full post here.

Pages


Calendar
Directory of DH Scholars

Looking for collaborators, expertise, or other scholars with related interests? 

Please see our list of affiliated scholars at KU.

If you would like to be included in this list please complete our affiliated scholars form.

 

KU Today
Home to 50+ departments, centers, and programs, the School of the Arts, and the School of Public Affairs and Administration
KU offers courses in 40 languages
No. 1 ranking in city management and urban policy —U.S. News and World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times