Providing resources and trai­ning in the practices and tools of the digital humanities
  • Home
  • Programs
  • CoLang 2012

CoLang 2012

Workshops18 – 29 June 2012

Practicum2 – 27 July 2012

CoLang 2012 was a six-week Institute on Collabora­tive Lan­guage Re­search (formerly InField), held at the University of Kansas in the sum­mer of 2012, sponosred by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The Institute provided an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students, prac­ticing lin­guists, and community linguists to become trained in a wide range of skills in community-cen­tered language documentation. Suc­cess­fully held in 2008 (UCSB) and 2010 (U of Oregon), and to be held in 2014 at the U of N Texas, the six-week insti­tute consists of two parts: the Work­shops - two weeks of intensive workshops on the practice of documentary linguistics – followed by a Practicum – a four-week apprenticeship in the applica­tion of linguis­tic science and techno­logy to on-site empirical documentation (a.k.a. “field linguis­tics”). The two parts are integrated, as students who enroll in the Practicum are required to enroll in the preceding Workshops, thereby re­ceiving an intensive course in docu­mentary best practices before putting these skills to use. Participants may choose to enroll only in the two-week Work­shops.

Governance: CoLang (formerly InField) has been guided by an ad hoc committee since 2008. The community of InField/CoLang participants and instructors intend to hold the Institute every other year at different institutions. A charter statement for the Institute is now available; feedback is welcome.

Sample Practicum results (Uyghur Frog Stories):  In 2010, Uyghur was one of the three focus languages the University of Oregon (along with Northern Paiute and Wapishana). The class, which included native speaker and KU Uyghur instructor Dr. Mahire Yakup, recorded Frog Stories from three different speakers, and grammatically annotated one of these stories.  Arienne Dwyer (PI of both CoLang 2012 and the Uyghur Light Verbs project) completed annotating all three texts and in collaboration with Dr. C.M. Sperberg-McQueen, Gülnar Eziz and Travis Major, and NSF support has allowed public access to the XML versions of these Uyghur Frog Stories on the Uyghur Light Verbs website.

 

 

CoLang 2012 is sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Documenting Endangered Languages Program, NSF-BCS1065469.

 


Follow Us
Call for Papers for our 2014 Digital Humanities Forum is now out!
EVENT: Documentary Editing in the Digital Age w/ Amy Hughes, Brooklyn College: April 21, 1:30pm http://t.co/yl6XGIpwSW
Ted Underwood - Beyond tools: linking computer science to the humanities Ted Underwood - University of Illinois Beyond tools: the questions about interpretation that link computer science to the humanities Digital Humanities Seminar, University of Kansas Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities & Hall Center for the Humanities March 31, 2014 http://idrh.ku.edu -- The term "digital humanities" tends to stage contemporary developments in the humanities as a confrontation, not with specific ideas or disciplines, but with digital technology itself. That's part of the logic of the term's success, but for good or ill, this talk will aim at a narrower, socially concrete topic. I'm interested, not in the web or in computers as such, but in the human beings who study computer science. To the extent that humanists discuss CS at all, we tend to imagine it as a narrowly instrumental discourse. And there's some truth to that: a large part of what I want to do is show off some neat tricks computer scientists have invented that turn out to be useful for the humanities (and especially for literary history). I'll focus on topic modeling (which casts new light on the history of humanistic disciplines), and on supervised learning algorithms (which provide an interestingly flexible way to approach the history of genre). But I also want to suggest that the conversation between computer scientists and humanists needn't be purely instrumental, or fully contained in "tools" that we borrow from CS. In some ways computer science is a surprisingly flexible hermeneutic discourse, and humanists may have more in common with it than we imagine.


Home to 50+ departments, centers, and programs, the School of the Arts, and the School of Public Affairs and Administration
KU offers courses in 40 languages
Graduates of the College have won Emmys, discovered new species, and been named to Forbes' "most powerful women" lists
No. 1 ranking in city management and urban policy —U.S. News and World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA