Providing resources and trai­ning in the practices and tools of the digital humanities

Workshops

Thursday, September 29 - All workshops are in Watson Library, University of Kansas, 1425 Jayhawk Blvd.


Data Yoga: The Practice and Discipline of File Management (20 seats)
9 a.m. to noon
Watson Library, 4th Floor, Room 455
Instructor: Jamene Brooks-Kieffer, University of Kansas

Frustration with file management saps your time and energy. Searching for the bits and pieces of material that inform your work distracts you from the work itself – thinking, writing, creating. No one solution exists to magically transform either your files or your habits. Rather, a regular practice of systematic file management implemented over time decreases stress and cognitive load, allowing you to focus on your work. Systematic file management techniques are easy to learn and apply but require discipline to maintain over the life of a project or a career. Similarly, yoga poses and sequences can be straightforward to learn yet require regular practice, and the discipline to engage in such a practice, in order to be truly transformational.
Come to this workshop to:

  • Bust the myth of the File Management Unicorn
  • Learn practical techniques for file management
  • Practice these techniques on your own files in a devoted time and space
  • Pause for periodic yoga interludes throughout the workshop, led by a trained instructor

Requirements/Prerequisites: Bring your current project and your laptop
No yoga experience necessary
No mat required
Wear loose, comfortable clothes


Using XSL to Transform and Extract Information from XML Documents (20 seats)
9 a.m. to noon
Watson Library , 3rd Floor, Clark Instruction Center (CIC)
Instructor: Jeff Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Learn how to search for, display, style and publish XML documents, whether a corpus or a single document. Sample documents will be provided, and/or bring your own XML documents.


THIS SESSION IS FULL. If you would like to be put on a waiting list please note this in the comments section of the registration form or contact IDRH - idrh@ku.edu.
Building Map Stories (20 seats)
1-3 p.m.
Watson Library, 3rd Floor, Clark Instruction Center (CIC)
Instructors: Rhonda Houser, University of Kansas

This session is about building stories around maps in a digital context. Participants will create online exhibits anchored by a map using Omeka software with the Neatline tool (http://neatline.org). This tool is useful for integrating small collections of data and maps with pictures, text, and more. A timeline component allows features to be displayed within a historical framework. The training will be hands-on and computers provided (bring your own if you like). We will provide sample files, but participants may also bring files related to projects or research. No prior experience needed.


THIS SESSION IS FULL. If you would like to be put on a waiting list please note this in the comments section of the registration form or contact IDRH - idrh@ku.edu.
Creating A Digital Edition of A Text: From Transcription to Publication (15 seats)
1-2:30 p.m.
Watson Library, 5th Floor, Room 503
Instructors: Martha Baldwin and Laura Mielke, University of Kansas

Through hands-on activities and with reference to concrete examples, this workshop will cover the ins and outs of preparing digital editions of literary texts and historical documents. In particular, the participants will be introduced to best practices for transcription of archival sources; encoding in XML that complies with TEI guidelines; annotating a document; and avenues for on-line publication. Leaders will touch on the use of digital tools such as the Oxygen XML editor and Juxta Collation software in the process of creating a digital edition. Participants need not have a specific project in mind to participate (though they certainly may), and no previous experience with editing required.


Friday, September 30 - All workshops are in Watson Library, University of Kansas, 1425 Jayhawk Blvd.


THIS SESSION IS FULL. If you would like to be put on a waiting list please note this in the comments section of the registration form or contact IDRH - idrh@ku.edu.
Data for Humanists: An Introduction to Digital Humanities Data (20 seats)
9 a.m. to noon
Watson Library, 4th Floor, Room 455
Instructor: Pam Lach, San Diego State University

This workshop will offer a primer on data for humanists, including an introduction to data types and databases, and how to think about humanistic scholarship in data terms. Participants will explore what it means to undertake data-driven digital humanities projects and will experiment with approaches to translating and transforming traditional objects of humanistic inquiry into data. No previous experience with digital humanities or relational databases is required. Participants should bring a laptop or tablet and are encouraged to bring a dataset (analog or digital) to work with.


THIS SESSION IS FULL. If you would like to be put on a waiting list please note this in the comments section of the registration form or contact IDRH - idrh@ku.edu.
Social Media and Place (20 seats)
9 a.m. to noon
Watson Library, 3rd Floor, Clark Instruction Center (CIC)
Instructor: Germaine Halegoua, University of Kansas

User-generated content on social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Wikipedia, etc. are increasingly utilized for research and analysis of social, cultural, and political issues in the digital humanities and beyond. There are currently several easy-to-use programs and tools developed to help researchers collect and analyze these social media traces. However, there are also complex methodological and ethical issues researchers should be aware of when conceiving projects and working with social media data. This workshop will provide participants with a guided opportunity to use some free, “off the shelf” social media analysis tools as well as time to discuss ethics, methods, observations, and what social media data can tell us (and not tell us) about place.

The first hour will be devoted to using tools like Netvizz and Gephi (that don’t require any coding skills) in order to compile social media data and visualizations that can be analyzed and discussed. Participants should come prepared with a topic, question, place, or site they’re interested in investigating through social media data.

The remainder of the workshop will focus on a discussion of preliminary findings from the one-hour data collection exercise as related to larger theoretical and methodological questions and concerns around social media and place.

Researchers from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.


 THIS SESSION IS FULL. If you would like to be put on a waiting list please note this in the comments section of the registration form or contact IDRH - idrh@ku.edu.
Long Lasting Documents: An Introduction to Markdown (15 seats)
1-3 p.m
Watson Library, 4th Floor, Room 410
Instructor: Élika Ortega, Northeastern University

Writing and formatting documents is, perhaps, one of the most recurrent activities of academic work. Most times, however, this work relies on the use of proprietary tools that impose Terms and Use Agreements, constant updating cycles, and corporate information organization models. Markdown is a styling plain text syntax. Rather than just styling, markdown adds “meaning” to a document that can be read by other platforms and converted to a variety of file formats like html, pdf, LaTex, etc. Stored as plain text, markdown files are long lasting and require no updating or migrating from one software version to another. Markdown is quickly becoming the basis of static and other web platforms.
 
In this two-hour workshop, participants will learn the basics of the markdown syntax, produce their own documents, and learn how to convert them to other formats for publication, sharing, and preservation.


Directory of DH Scholars

Looking for collaborators, expertise, or other scholars with related interests? 

Please see our list of affiliated scholars at KU.

If you would like to be included in this list please complete our affiliated scholars form.

 

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