Providing resources and trai­ning in the practices and tools of the digital humanities
  • Home
  • Digital Humanities Now »
Subscribe to Digital Humanities Now feed
Community-Curated Content Published by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Updated: 37 min 14 sec ago

CFP: CMC and Social Media Corpora 2018

Tue, 03/06/2018 - 13:30

From the call:

‘CMC-corpora 2018’ is the 6th edition of an annual conference series dedicated to the collection, annotation, processing and exploitation of corpora of computer-mediated communication (CMC) and social media for research in the humanities. The conference brings together language-centered research on CMC and social media in linguistics, philologies, communication sciences, media and social sciences with research questions from the fields of corpus and computational linguistics, language technology, text technology, and machine learning.

Read the call here.

CFP: 2018 Digital Frontiers (IDRH)

Tue, 03/06/2018 - 12:00

From the call:

Digital Frontiers has posted a call for proposals for the 2018 Digital Frontiers/University of Kansas’s Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities (IDRH) Digital Humanities Forum, to be held October 4-5 at the University of Kansas. The theme for the conference is “Finding Community in Digital Humanities.”

Read full post here.

Opportunity: US History Scene Summer 2018 Internships

Tue, 03/06/2018 - 11:30

From the post:

U.S. History Scene, a multimedia history education project founded by Harvard historians, is currently seeking undergraduate and graduate applicants for its Summer 2018 Historical Writing and Research Internship Program. Interns will gain valuable writing and publishing skills through the process of writing, submitting, and editing original multimedia research articles, book reviews, and classroom lesson plans. All interns will work one-on-one with our Editorial Board to gain experience in primary source research, editing, and publishing. We will assist interns in applying for stipends or university credit, and we partner with universities around the United States to ensure that interns are compensated for their public history work. Internships can be performed via telecommute from your home university.

Read full post here.

Editor’s Choice: Diversity Work and Digital Carework in Higher Education

Tue, 03/06/2018 - 11:00

“Diversity” has become a managerial directive for the twenty-first century university in the United States. In its endless pursuit of diversity, the contemporary academy has required faculty, staff, and administrators to perform diversity work, marshaling the labor of employees to undertake diversity initiatives, often in addition to their stated job descriptions. Participating in diversity work is a trap into which those whose work is guided by an ethical commitment to communities underrepresented in academia and those who belong to these communities risk falling. This phenomenon has a long history, reflecting a tradition of activism performed by people of color, women, and LGBTQ scholars who have demanded that the scholarship of their communities be taken seriously as “academic.” Yet, the advent of social media has added new dimensions to this labor.

As such, what I term “digital carework” has become essential to academic labor. Digital carework, in this instance, is a form of affective digital labor that relies on the deployment of affect through digital media to remediate inequalities within higher education. It ranges from managing affect in the production and distribution of scholarship to providing emotional labor to fellow colleagues and students in response to the challenges faced by those who engage in “diversity work” (Ahmed, 2012). Digital carework around diversity has played a visible role in digital humanities, in which I situate my scholarship. This particular form of digital carework illuminates the confluence of affective and digital forms of labor that are essential to diversity initiatives in the neoliberal university. As in other areas of higher education, this labor preys on the optimism of early career scholars, typically women, people of color, and LGBTQ scholars, or a combination thereof. They undertake diversity work and the digital carework it requires through both explicit and implicit direction from universities and scholarly communities.

Read full article here.

Pages


Directory of DH Scholars

Looking for collaborators, expertise, or other scholars with related interests? 

Please see our list of affiliated scholars at KU.

If you would like to be included in this list please complete our affiliated scholars form.

 

KU Today
Home to 50+ departments, centers, and programs, the School of the Arts, and the School of Public Affairs and Administration
KU offers courses in 40 languages
No. 1 ranking in city management and urban policy —U.S. News and World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times