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Digital Humanities Seed Grants

Funded Projects

2013

Project Title: From the brushes of ancient scribes: an online database and intuitive visualization interface for research into the fifth-century BC Wenxian Covenant Texts
Description: The grant will fund the construction and initial data entry for an online database critical to realize the full research potential of the Wenxian Covenant Texts. The website’s sophisticated search options and intuitive visualization interface will reveal complex relationships between these texts, their media, provenance, script, scribes, and language. Software will include MySQL, PHP, XHTML with CSS, HTML5. The pilot study will attract external funding, ensuring the project’s completion. This will result in publications, a public website, and a new Open Source visualization interface.
P.I.: Crispin Williams, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures
Awarded March 2013
 

2011

Project Title: Digital Resources for Second Language Acquisition Research: an Annotated Longitudinal Corpus of Learner German
Description: This project aims to annotate, analyze, and make publicly available a digital longitudinal corpus of writing samples collected from American learners of German at dense time intervals over several semesters. This project will advance the digital humanistic scholarship by applying a new annotation schema developed specifically for learner language, evaluating the output of this annotation, and publishing the corpus and studies afforded by this annotation. This international project will combine the PI’s language acquisition expertise and the collaborator's computational linguistics expertise.
P.I.: Nina Vyatkina, Assistant Professor, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Awarded May 2011

Seed Grant Guidelines

The anticipated deadline for the next round of Seed Grant awards is January 2014.


The IDRH Digital Humanities Seed Grants are intended to encourage KU faculty and academic staff to plan or pilot a collaborative project using digital technologies, which should in turn result in a more competitive subsequent external funding application. The digital humanities use “digital media and technology to advance the full range of thought and practice in the humanities, from the creation of scholarly resources, to research on those resources, to the communication of results to colleagues and students” (Cohen 2011).

Description: Proposals should be for the initial stages of digital research in the humanities, and include a commitment to apply within a year for external funding. Seed grants may be used to create pilot projects, develop ideas via a workshop, attend workshops, support project-related travel, hold a substantial planning or brainstorming session, or similar activities. Projects can include, but are not limited to:

  • text analysis and data-mining techniques;
  • data visualization techniques;
  • applying of Geographic Information Systems to humanities research;
  • examining the emerging multimedia and multimodal technologies in the humanities;
  • collaborative work via Internet sites and tools (e.g. commons-based peer production);
  • development of new digital tools for analyzing and making available digital resources;
  • new digital models of publication and dissemination of scholarship;
  • digital technology for research and teaching;

Outcomes: IDRH Seed Grants should result in pilot projects, plans, or prototypes that will be used to pursue subsequent external funding. Successful applicants may be asked to present their project as part of the Hall Center for the Humanities Faculty Seminar in Digital Humanities.

Eligibility: KU full-time humanities and social science faculty.

Anticipated funding levels: Up to $15,000.

To apply: Please refer to the 2013 Seed Grant Proposal Guidelines and Application Form (PDF) for more information. (The 2013 Seed Grant competition is now closed. Guidelines subject to change for future grant rounds.)

 


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Reminder: Nodes & Networks in the Humanities: Call for Papers deadline is Sunday June 15. We are offering $400 award for best graduate student paper.
Matt Cohen - Editing Walt Whitman's Marginalia Today: Digital Humanities Methods at the Edge Matt Cohen, UT-Austin Digital Humanities Seminar, University of Kansas Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities & Hall Center for the Humanities May 1, 2014 http://idrh.ku.edu -- This talk is about methodology in the humanities. It begins with a discussion of the most basic practice of humanities research: note-taking. Annotations, marginalia, all of the methods of sifting, highlighting, and gathering: these are the substrate of our larger claims and discoveries. Such is the case even when we are working with "big data," topic modeling, natural language processing, and other automated techniques for what Franco Moretti has called "distant reading." The talk then reflects on the claims for methodology in and as what is being called the digital humanities. These observations emerge at the junction of two occasions. The first is a project to digitize the poet Walt Whitman's annotations and marginalia, his personal metadata on his reading. This NEH-funded project is at the end of its first phase, and will be published later this year for free access at the Walt Whitman Archive (http://www.whitmanarchive.org/). The second spur is the active conversation about the digital humanities as a methodological crucible or fountain; both the tenor and the content of that conversation are occasions for considering the status of method in the humanities.


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